Changing Tides: Celebrating Women’s Valor on Veterans Day

This Veterans Day, Americans will celebrate the sacrifice and heroism of those who served in uniform from World War I to the most recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of us will thank our brothers, fathers, uncles, and perhaps even grandfathers for their patriotism and military service. Far fewer Americans will extend their arms … Continue reading Changing Tides: Celebrating Women’s Valor on Veterans Day

SMA-sponsored workshop: That Almost Finished Journal Article

Cost: Students: $40 Professionals: $80 Date: 11/18/2015 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Organizer/Facilitator: Dr. Jaida Kim Samudra What makes your workshop a “must attend” event for the 2015 meeting? This workshop is a must for any academic who has stalled on submitting or revising an article to a peer-reviewed journal.  Everybody knows that to get hired, … Continue reading SMA-sponsored workshop: That Almost Finished Journal Article

What Halloween Masks

October 31st is America’s curious anomaly.  On October’s last day, as trees defoliate and nature ebbs towards the deadness of winter, parents mark the day by lifting  prohibitions.  From sugar treats to stranger visiting, what is usually forbidden falls within kids’ reach.  That day children lampoon adults, dressing up in roles of mature power (princesses, … Continue reading What Halloween Masks

Bringing art to breast cancer care: 3D nipple tattooing

Few people realize how long and complex breast cancer treatment is. The Komen Foundation and Avon rarely highlight post-surgery debacles in their fundraising literature, and the visceral reality of scars is seldom discussed unless being celebrated. As the model Matuschka showed in her 1993 photograph and more recently anthropologist Lochlain Jain in her bio-ethnography Malignant, … Continue reading Bringing art to breast cancer care: 3D nipple tattooing

Bayira, an ancient Ethiopian skeleton, provides the earliest African genome

In 2012, an archaeological team funded by the National Science Foundation and led by Kathryn and John Arthur (both of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg) and Matthew Curtis (Ventura College and UCLA Extension), excavated Mota Cave in the Gamo Highlands of Southwestern Ethiopia and recovered a 4,500-year-old male human skeleton that has provided … Continue reading Bayira, an ancient Ethiopian skeleton, provides the earliest African genome

Final Report: Task Force on AAA Engagement on Israel-Palestine

Read the full report.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Recent years have seen increasing pressure in the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and many other professional academic associations to discuss alleged Israeli violations of academic freedom and human rights, and to move toward sanctioning Israel. More than 1,100 anthropologists, many of whom are AAA members, have now signed a … Continue reading Final Report: Task Force on AAA Engagement on Israel-Palestine