AAA Debuts New Blog

AAA is pleased to announce the debut of our new, unified association blog. We have created this blog as a service to our members and the general public. It is a forum to discuss topics of debate in anthropology and a space for public commentary on association policies, publications and advocacy issues. We will post select items that we think are of interest to our members and that readers have voiced an interest in. We invite all anthropologists to use this domain to stimulate intellectual discussion, and would be delighted to host guest bloggers who are active in any of anthropology’s four fields.

The new AAA blog, available through WordPress, combines our previous Anthropology News, Public Affairs and Human Rights blogs, with all archived content and comments migrated from Blogger to WordPress. The updated format enables visitors to easily post comments, link to our Flickr photostream, search content, browse posts by category, find other anthropology blogs, and more. This is a living forum, and we welcome your feedback! Use the “Contact Us” bar at the top of the screen to tell us what you think of this new design and to offer content suggestions.

AAA thanks staff members Brian Estes, Lisa Myers and Dinah Winnick, and intern Leo Napper, for their work in developing this online forum.

8 comments

  1. i enjoy the look of the new site! I thought I would offer a content suggestion – the Women of Tibet film series. It consists of two out of a trilogy of well-made documentaries about the women of Tibet. They have both aired on PBS, and will air there again – for a schedule check the website. The first film in the series is “Gualyum Chemo – The Great Mother” (trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Fb_1hTECBw) and tells the compelling story of the life of Dekyi Tsering, the mother of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. The second in the series is “A Quiet Revolution” (trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY8PEghB_Ng) and is about the amazing struggle and nonviolent resistance of 15,000 Tibetan women who took the streets of Lhasa to oppose the violent occupation by China. You can support these films and the making of the third film in the trilogy (currently under production) by buying copies of the DVD’s for yourself, your friends, and your family. They are priced for educators and institutions as well as individual viewers.

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